Thursday, 1 March 2018

Stay safe in the snow!

snow, safety, family health, health advice
School's out for winter...!
The school is shut and your work train is cancelled - so there's big cheers all around as friends and family declare a 'snow day'. But as well as being lots of fun, dipping temperates, snow and ice can present challenges too - and be dangerous to the elderly, those that are pregnant and newborn to school age children. Follow our tops tips to enjoy the snow without falling foul of the wintery weather.

A warm home

One of the most important things to remember when it's cold outside is to keep your house at the right temperature - the NHS advises that to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), babies should sleep in rooms heated to between 16℃ and 20℃. Ahead of the winter it's always worth bleeding radiators and checking your insulation is still up to scratch. But on a day-to-day basis you can make the most of the heat you have by closing curtains at dusk - and open them in sunshine. If you've had the oven on - leave the door open when you're finished. Draught excluders by the door and rugs on colder wooden floors also help, and if you have a chimney that's not in use, use a device to block up the gap.


Monday, 5 February 2018

Three simple ways to eat healthy

diet, weight loss, healthy eating
Britain has a love affair with processed and unhealthy foods...
It's official, the UK has the unhealthiest diet in Europe. Last week news that us Brits eat five times more processed food than those living in Portugal, and four times more than those in France, Greece and Italy, hit the headlines. 

In fact, the researchers from the University of São Paulo, revealed that half of the average person’s diet in the UK is made up of food that has been altered someway in its preparation - from breakfast cereals to ready meals. And that puts us at more risk of obesity, heart disease and strokes. 

Not surprisingly, food and health experts have since dubbed the UK a 'public health disaster zone'.

The problem with processed food is that during manufacture many of the nutrients are lost - and are instead replaced with artificial substances, sugar, salt and fat. When food lacks nutrition we tend to eat more - and many of the added substances can also be addictive, again tricking our minds to overeat and never feel satisfied. The UK government currently relies on the food industry to regulate itself - with mixed results - which also means shopping for healthier choices is made harder. So with convenience food so readily available, how can we really change our diets - and improve our long-term health? 

Here are three ways to overhaul your eating habits - and improve your health - for good...